Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

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transplanted_entwife
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Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Tue Mar 22, 2011 7:16 pm

It's been mentioned in chat several times and I'm finally getting around to it... here's a thread for clan members and honored guests to post their recipes. =)

I'll start with a chili recipe (which I'm eating at the moment, actually):

TE's Chili

1 lb ground beef
1 chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
splash of red wine (duh)
3 15oz cans chili Beans in sauce (do not drain)
3 15oz cans petite diced tomatoes (do not drain)
1 15oz can dark red kidney beans (drain and rinse)
1 pkg chili seasoning (I use McCormicks)

Brown the ground beef with the onion and garlic; drain if needed
Throw everything else in
Simmer for an hour (can do this for longer- just add a bit of water if needed)

Serve with sour cream, Tobasco, jalapenos, shredded cheese, fritos and these:


Double Corn Dumplings

3/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tsp baking powder
1/8 tsp salt
1/2 cup fresh corn kernels (or 1 can of Niblets)
1/2 cup milk
2 Tbs vegetable oil


In medium bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, baking powder,
and salt. Stir in corn, milk, and oil. Spoon on cooked hot
stew or chili. Cover and cook 30 to 35 minutes.
Last edited by transplanted_entwife on Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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stupac2
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by stupac2 » Tue Mar 22, 2011 7:50 pm

All of my recipes involve the step, "have snark make it", do those count?

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Jaelith
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Jaelith » Tue Mar 22, 2011 11:15 pm

Because I can mostly copy/paste from the email I sent to my friend a week or so ago!

If you'd like to while away an hour and a half or so in the kitchen making yourself fat and happy... here's my recipe for sour cream enchiladas:

Filling:

Get an impulse-buy rotisserie chicken: remove skin and shred it down once it's cool enough to handle
~1/2 a smallish white onion, dice it up. if you want the flavor to soften, saute it in some butter. If not cooking for [best friend who inexplicably doesn't like onions], use more onion and don't saute it. :D Mix in with chicken.
~1.5 cup shredded cheese into bowl with chicken/onions. pepperjack is our favorite, but about any cheese does.
"some" cilantro
"some" salt, pepper, cumin (not much on that last one)

Mix it all around, taste it and make sure it's delicious, add whatever you think it needs, set it aside. Heads up: almost always makes more than you need. I save extra + some sauce in a container and have extra insides for a lunch. Or eat a bunch while you're cooking. :)

Note: if you decide to do chicken breasts instead of impulse-buy chicken, you want 4 and cook 'em how you'd like them, but you probably want to add some olive oil in to the mixture. Really not anywhere near as recommended as using impulse-buy chicken.

Sauce:

Decision point: tomatillos for reals or tomatillos in a can.
If in can: want about ~10 oz. I found some salsa verde that just had tomatillos/onions/salt in it, 2 7oz cans, so I simmered that to reduce it down.
If reals: want about 8 good size ones. Broil on foil-lined pan until blackedy, about 4 min, flip, 'nother 4 min. Set aside. You probably need more salt in this case by the way.

Dice up some peppers. Last time I used one red jalapeno, one green jalapeno, and one serrano (i like the red flecks in it). Whatever you have around.
2 tbps butter in a pot, saute peppers in it for 3-4 min (until soft)
Mince/garlic-press ~2 or 3 cloves garlic into pot, stir around a min or so ("fragrant"!)
2 tbsp flour into pot, whisk whisk whisk to soak up butter. about a min.
2 cups chicken broth into pot, simmer and stir until a bit thick (coat back of spoon a bit)
1 tsp cumin into pot, "some" cayenne, and some more cilantro (1/4th cuppish maybe?)
2 cups sour cream into pot, whisk until incorporated then take off heat.

If you have a stick blender: pour tomatillos (from whatever provenance) into pot, stick blend until happy with it. rejoice at stick blender
If you don't, pour sauce + tomatillos into blender and zap.

Taste, add salt if necessary.

Construction:

Spread ~cup sauce into baking dish
Get tortillas pliable [we PAM corn tortillas and cook 'em in a skillet.... the boy flaps 'em around and hands them to me to fill/roll]
Put ~1/3rd cup filling into tortillas, roll up and place into dish seam side down. We use a 9x13 dish, run 10 enchiladas across and 2 lengthwise
Pour over as much of sauce as is reasonable. Save rest with leftover chicken bits or just... drink it. hypothetically. not that i do that. ever.
Cover with moar shredded cheese

Bake @350 for ~25 min. Turn on broiler for the last couple min to get all brown and bubbly. Sprinkle cilantro on top for pretties.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by lostcalpolydude » Wed Mar 23, 2011 4:42 am

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients:
1 cup cooked pumpkin
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 egg
2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp milk
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 12-oz bag of semi-sweet chocolate chips

Makes approx. 2 dozen cookies

Combine pumpkin, sugar, oil and egg in one bowl
Combine baking powder, flour, cinnamon, and salt in another bowl
Dissolve baking soda in milk
Combine all three mixes
Add vanilla, add chocolate chips to taste

Bake at 350-375 degrees for approx. 12 minutes
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by JennyUnderpants » Wed Mar 23, 2011 9:28 am

lostcalpolydude wrote:Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies
*slobber*
The following will get long. Because I care greatly about pie, I feel burdened to share everything :D

Pie Crust (also copied and pasted from email)
Some notes:
- there is a marked difference between using a pastry cutter which I used for 3 years prior to owning a pimp food processor and using a pimp food processor, which I got for Christmas in December. First, it's much, much faster and much, much easier. Second, because the fat is chopped into much tinier pieces than my arms and a pastry cutter are capable of, the texture of the crust is totally different. Third, I don't get nearly as messy. I used to end up with flour all over myself and my workspace. If you don't have a food processor, a pastry cutter is still perfectly fine.

I've heard you can use 2 knives, but I'm pretty sure that's full of crap. In terms of pastry cutters, I've gone through 3-4 of them. One like this which is no good because the blade part is affixed to the handle part with a pretty simple peg-n-hole assembly, and after extended use the peg starts popping out of the hole.

One like this which is no good because the wire blendy parts are to flimsy for their purpose. After just 2 pies, they're all bent out of shape.

And my favorite one looks like this. The blades are nice and solid, and the thing is screwed together. Plus, it was the cheapest one at both Giant and Harris Teeter!

- Only use vodka. Not gin, not rum, not tequila, not wine, and never beer. Water + flour = gluten = tough crust that's unwieldy and cracks around the edges when you roll it out. Vodka + flour = tacky dough that begs you roll it out and put it in a pie plate. It's almost like Play-Doh, it's so wieldy. And vodka is mostly flavorless so you get all the moisture without all the tough crust.

- Make sure your fats are cold! I keep the Crisco in the freezer and refrigerate the butter. Frozen butter is too hard. Warm fat crusts end up being more like tarts.

- I must have about 6 pie plates and by far the best one is the Pyrex one that they sell at the grocery store in stacks. Why? They're cheap, easy to wash, and you can see through them and tell when your crust is just about done. The Pioneer Woman turns her nose up at glass pie plates, but don't listen to her because she also uses ALL CRISCO CRUSTS, so she can go suck one. Plus have you SEEN her crusts?! Hideous. I hate the Pioneer Woman with a white hot fiery passion. Anyway, I tend to lose pie plates when I take them to my friends' houses, so I try to keep 2 9" plates, 2 9 1/2" deep dishes, and 1 10-inch plate around. It is a very rare occasion when I make a 10-inch pie.

- I roll out on Silpat with a piece of parchment paper on top. Then you can just take the parchment paper, flip the crust into the plate, and peel the parchment paper off without too much hassle or stretching of the dough (stretching causes shrinkage!). If you use a French rolling pin (the kind that's not on an axle), you probably won't need the Silpat. Though it is awfully nice for avoiding slippage.

- This particular recipe (from Cooks Illustrated) makes a double crust. If you're making a single crust pie, you can freeze the other one for up to 3 months. I don't know about you, but I've never had a problem using all the crusts I make >.>

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (King Arthur!)
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp sugar
12 tbsp cold butter (1 1/2 sticks), cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 cup vegetable shortening (1/2 a Crisco brick), cut into 4 pieces
1/4 c cold vodka
1/4 c ice water

1. Blend 1 1/2 cups of flour, salt, and sugar together.
2. Cut in the fats until all the flour is worked into the fat, or until your arms fall off. Or if you're using a food processor, pulse the fats with the flour mixture until you have a homogeneous mixture resembling corn meal. Add the remaining cup of flour and blend/pulse until evenly distributed.
3. Sprinkle in the vodka and water. Start with the vodka and then add the water gradually. Use a wooden spoon to smush it all together until you get a consistent, tacky dough. Separate the whole thing into two balls (I break out the food scale to make sure they're even >.>) and flatten them into 5-inch circles. Wrap them in plastic and stuff them in the fridge for at least 45 minutes. Or the freezer if you're not going to use it.

One day when I feel like writing another Pie dissertation, I may include an actual pie recipe and instructions on how to partially and fully pre-bake a pie crust as well as how to make it all pretty. It involves beans, kitchen shears, and small fingers.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by top1214 » Wed Mar 23, 2011 10:49 am

For you guys, my balls.

Cheesy Risotto Balls

Ingredients:
3 eggs beaten (but in 2 batches 1 egg, and 2 eggs)
1 1/2 cups of cool risotto
~6oz mozzarella cheese cubes
Flour (1/4 cup?)
Breadcrumbs (1/2 cup?)
Oil (for frying)

1) Start w/cold risotto. Preferably day (or two) old. (If you want my recipe for that, let me know. I didn't use special risotto rice, just some medium grain rice).

2) Beat two eggs. MIx into the risotto. Try taking a small amount out, shape it into a ball, and see if it holds tat shape on its own (Put it down on a cutting board). If not, stir in some breadcrumbs, and repeat until it does.

3) Insert a small cube(s) of mozzarella into the middle of the riceball. Somewhere between a date and an apricot is probably the best size. I stuck the cheese on the outside then tossed the ball between my hands to get the cheese towards the middle, but you can easily just poke a hole in the rice w/your finger, insert cheese, and cover. Adjust the cheesiness to your taste. I used about 6oz. for 1 1/2 cups of risotto Sunday.

4) Roll in flour, then a beaten egg (add some water when you beat it. If it is too thick, too much will stick to the ball), finally breadcrumbs (I used Italian style, no additional spices added).

5) Deep fry. I fried for about 3-5minutes per batch, but do whatever color/crispness your looking for.

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Mini Meatloaves

Post by transplanted_entwife » Thu Mar 31, 2011 7:57 pm

Mini Meatloaves

3 teaspoons olive oil
1 1/2 chopped onions
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 large eggs
1/2 cup milk
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon Tobasco
1 teaspoon fresh marjoram
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 pound twice-ground Chuck
1/2 pound twice-ground veal (YES, BABY COW- GET OVER IT THEY ARE NOM)
1/2 pound twice-ground pork
1 1/2 cups fresh bread crumbs
1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves

KETCHUP-GLAZE:
1/2 cup ketchup
4 tablespoons light brown sugar
4 teaspoons cider vinegar

Directions
In a skillet heat the oil. Add onion and garlic and saute, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes. Set aside and let cool.
In a mixing bowl whisk the eggs, milk, mustard, hot sauce. Add marjoram, thyme, salt, and pepper.
In a large mixing bowl combine the meats, egg-milk mixture, bread crumbs, parsley and cooked onion-garlic mixture.
Transfer meat mixture into mini-loaf tins (should have small holes in the bottom and be sitting on a baking sheet ). Brush meat with ketchup glaze. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for about 20 to 25 minutes, until glaze has set. Brush meat loaf with remaining glaze and bake for 45 minutes, until that coat has set too. Internal temperature of loaves should be 160 degrees.

NOTES:

All right, I've made these with half chuck and half pork and they are fine. Really, though, veal makes them better.
I usually double the amt of Tobasco but I like it hot. =P
I buy the disposable aluminum mini-loaf pans, punch a bunch of holes in the bottom of them w a fork, and set them on a wire baking rack on a cookie sheet. This recipe will fill about 8 of them.
Leftovers are EXCELLENT as meatloaf sammiches.
Last edited by transplanted_entwife on Sun May 08, 2011 3:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Whym » Thu Mar 31, 2011 8:26 pm

JennyUnderpants wrote:Awesomeness
I...I think I'll go make some pie.


Also, I will totally post a recipe on this thread when I get one together. I have a pretty good Korean Chinese Sweet&Sour Pork recipe. (Yes, Korean Chinese, you read that correctly. It's like the difference between Chinese food and American Chinese food, get it?)

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by snarkypants » Sat Apr 02, 2011 10:48 am

Whym wrote:It's like the difference between Chinese food and American Chinese food, get it?)
So like the Manchurian chicken of Korea? (That's Indian Chinese food.) I'll have to get my wife's recipe for Manchurian tofu; it's great.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by JennyUnderpants » Sat Apr 02, 2011 1:33 pm

I told mara I'd give him an easy pie recipe, so here's the chocolate chip cookie pie I sent to IvanGS. And Fried. And Exactor it.
Edit: I'm only noticing I forgot brown sugar >. >

1 pie pastry, single crust
1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened (1 stick)*
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar
3 large eggs, at room temperature*
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup cake flour, sifted
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup whole milk or light cream
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips (I usually use more)
1/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts (totally optional, because I hate nuts in my baked goods)

* if you are like me, you never remember to keep eggs and butter out at room temperature when you need them. I run eggs under warmish-hottish water for several minutes to warm them up, and I put butter in a plastic baggie and then submerge the bag in hot water for several minutes to get it softened.

1. Refrigerate the pastry until firm enough to roll out, 45 minutes to 1 hour.

2. On a sheet of lightly floured parchment paper or wax paper, roll the pastry out into a 12-inch circle with a floured rolling pin. Invert the pastry over a 9-inch standard pie pan, center, and peel off the paper. Tuck the pastry into the pan without stretching it, and sculpt the edge into an upstanding ridge. Crimp. Place in freezer for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Pro tip: I use my kitchen shears to even up the edge before I start tucking. That way if there's one part of the crust that's too short for tucking, I can 'mend' it with one of the chunks of pastry I'd cut.

3. Using an electric mixer, cream the butter on medium speed in a large bowl, gradually adding the sugars. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in the vanilla. Add the flour and salt and blend until evenly mixed. Blend in the milk. Don't be concerned if the filling looks a little curdled after adding the milk. It's just a little curdled! It's still good! It's still good! Stir in the chocolate chips (and if you are gross, the walnuts too). Pour the filling into the chilled pie shell, smoothing the top with a spoon.

4. Place the pie on the center oven rack and bake until the center is set, about 1 hour, rotating the pie 180 degrees halfway through baking, so that the part that faced the back of the oven now faces forward. When done, the top of the pie will be a dark golden brown. That's fine; it doesn't mean that the pie is overbaked. Give the pie a slight nudge. The filling should not move in waves, even at the center. The pie will have a undercooked cookie texture to it.

5. Transfer the pie to a wire rack and let cool. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature. Or cover with loosely tented foil and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours before serving. Or wrap tightly, pack with dry ice, and ship across the country.
Last edited by JennyUnderpants on Sun May 29, 2011 11:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by JennyUnderpants » Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:10 pm

Because it is so very appropriate, Chinese Pork Shoulder

I made this recipe up with the sum of my Chinese and American cooking knowledge, so if you think of something that improves it, let me know! Also, I don't really measure with Chinese cooking, so I can't be 100% sure that these quantities are right.

1 tbsp vegetable/canola oil
1 pork shoulder (an authentic cut will have the circular bone and the fatty skin still attached. My people love slurping up that fatty skin. I myself do not like skin unless it's rendered and crispy, so I just get the boneless, skinless picnic shoulder tied up with twine)
1 2-inch chunk of ginger, sliced into 1/8 inch slices
3 scallions, end trimmed and cut into thirds
1 1-inch chunk of rock sugar
1 c chicken broth
4 tbsp soy sauce
4 tbsp rice wine
1 packet of spice for spiced food; if you can't find an asian market, you can just load up some cheesecloth with cinnamon, star anise, ground ginger, cardamom, and I dunno. I think the last one is coriander. Tie the cheesecloth with kitchen twine.
water
baby bok choy, ends trimmed and rinsed

1. If you're using the bony, skinned cut, parboil the meat for 2 minutes in a large Dutch oven/pot to remove the scum and impurities and render the fat a little. Move the pork to a plate, pour out the water, turn the heat off, and wipe the pot clean. Proceed to step 2. If you're using the skinless, boneless version, sprinkle salt on all sides of the pork shoulder. Heat oil on medium-high until oil starts shimmering. Brown the pork shoulder on all sides. Remove the pork shoulder, but don't clean the browned bits/fond from the pot. That stuff is delicious. You deglaze it! You deglaze it and you love it!

2. In the now empty pot, add the chicken broth (deglaze by scraping the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon). Then add everything else. Place the pork shoulder in the middle (move stuff out if its way as appropriate). Add enough water to come halfway up the meat. On high heat, bring the liquid to a boil, and then lower the heat to simmer for about 2 hours. I am extremely finicky about braising meat, so I flip my meat every half hour. When the meat is done, you should be able to stick a knife through it fairly easily. A stern glare should make it fall apart, really.

3. There should also be enough liquid left to blanch the baby bok choy. If there isn't, just blanch the bok choy in water. Remove all the solids from the braising liquid. Place the pork shoulder on a platter, surround it all pretty like by the bok choy, and pour the liquid over all of it. If there's a lot of liquid, you might want to reduce it over high heat a little, but I've never had that much liquid left over before.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by infern0 » Mon Apr 25, 2011 10:58 am

Anzac biscuits!

Biscuits the aussies and NZ people sent over to soldiers in WW1. Easy to make and quite tasty, good as a side for some other big baking project because they don't take long at all to make.

Some I prepared earlier :P
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Ingredients:
1 cup plain flour
1.5 cups rolled oats
0.5 cup castor sugar
2 tablespoons honey
150g unsalted butter, melted
1/2 teaspoon of bicarb soda
1/2 cup dessicated coconut (which I forgot to add, meh)

Makes: As many as you want! They're not supposed to be works of art.

Sift flour and sugar into bowl.
Add in oats and coconut.
Mix well.
Put butter in a small saucepan and heat on low until fully melted (alternatively, microwave)
Add honey in saucepan
Dissolve bicarb in a few tablespoons water and add to saucepan.
Pour contents of saucepan into dry ingredients and mix until combined.
Roll into balls and flatten on baking trays.
170C preheated oven for around 12-15minutes, or until golden.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by thacon » Mon Apr 25, 2011 11:12 am

I have a delicious, easy recipe that we make a lot. It's very scientific and precise, so follow very closely:

Saute some onions in a big skillet. (You could use a wok if you'd like. It's more fun to say.) I love onions, so I use a lot, but it's up to you. You can use whatever kind of onion you like the best. After the onions are ready (this is precisely the moment before they're past the point where you're ready for the second step) add tomatoes. I like to get a big can of whole tomatoes and rip them apart with my hands before throwing them in the skillet. You can chop them or slice them if you'd rather not have the visceral experience of killing your tomatoey prey prior to eating them. Make sure to get lots of seeds in there because tomato seeds contain all the tasty magic. Cook that for a while. You'll know it's ready when it smells extra delicious and you're tempted to just say screw it and start eating. But don't. Next get some shrimp. You can use whatever kind you want. Or, you know, chicken or beef or tofu or dolphin would probably work too. Throw that in there along with your tomato and onions. Then pour in some cinnamon and cumin. I like to use just enough to make a cloud of cinnamon dust appear in my kitchen. Cook that all together until your protein is edible. Serve over couscous.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by infern0 » Mon Apr 25, 2011 11:29 am

Japanese Melon Pan (bread)

The greatest bread of all time!

My semi-successful first attempt:
Image

Ingredients:

Bread dough:
300g bread flour
6g instant yeast
40g caster sugar
5g salt
6g skim milk powder
200ml warm water

Pastry dough:
80g warmed unsalted butter
90g caster sugar
80g egg, lightly beaten
200g cake flour
2g baking powder
A few drops of melon extract - can be substituted if desired.

Makes 12 melonpan.

Method

Bread layer
1. Sift flour, castor sugar, salt, yeast and milk powder into mixing bowl.
2. Add in warm water in parts, slowly mixing to form dough until sticky.
3. Knead until dough is no longer sticky
4. Flatten and fold butter into dough. Knead again until dough is no longer sticky. This will take 15 or so minutes.
5. Cover with clingwrap in a bowl and refrigerate for 1h or until it doubles in size

Pastry layer
1. Use an electric mixer to blend together butter and castor sugar until pale.
2. Add in melon extract
3. Add the beaten egg in parts, pulsing the mixer whilst adding
4. Sift in cake flour and baking powder
5. Mix until well combined and separate into 12 portions.
6. Place in tray and refrigerate for 30 minutes

Combine
1. Punch out the gas in the bread dough and divide into 12 portions. Roll into rounds and cover under a damp cloth.
2. Remove pastry layer from fridge. Flatten each dough between two sheets of non-stick seethrough plastic (clingwrap/clear plastic bags are fine)
3. Re-roll bread dough into rounds and flatten into discs.
4. Remove the top layer of plastic from the pastry layer and place the bread dough in the centre of the circular pastry. Carefully wrap the pastry layer over the bread dough ensuring to leave 2-3cm uncovered at the bottom (Or else it'll asplode in the oven). I found it easiest to wrap the bottom layer of plastic and pastry layer over the bread dough in 5 parts, forming a pentagon-ish product.
5. Carefully unpeel the bottom plastic off and flip over onto a baking tray.
6. Cover exterior with castor sugar and pattern as desired. The classic melon pan look is 3-4 lines horizontally and 85degrees along the bread, ensuring you don't go too deep.
7. Bake in a preheated oven at 180C for 15 minutes or until golden-brown. Ensure the bottoms don't blacken!

Celebrate and eat.

Variation:
Make more bread dough and turn each melon pan into a turtle, something like this:
Image <-- Some image ripped off some turtleporn site.

edited for truth.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Ringwraith » Sun May 01, 2011 8:09 am

thacon wrote:I have a delicious, easy recipe that we make a lot. It's very scientific and precise, so follow very closely:

Saute some onions in a big skillet. (You could use a wok if you'd like. It's more fun to say.) I love onions, so I use a lot, but it's up to you. You can use whatever kind of onion you like the best. After the onions are ready (this is precisely the moment before they're past the point where you're ready for the second step) add tomatoes. I like to get a big can of whole tomatoes and rip them apart with my hands before throwing them in the skillet. You can chop them or slice them if you'd rather not have the visceral experience of killing your tomatoey prey prior to eating them. Make sure to get lots of seeds in there because tomato seeds contain all the tasty magic. Cook that for a while. You'll know it's ready when it smells extra delicious and you're tempted to just say screw it and start eating. But don't. Next get some shrimp. You can use whatever kind you want. Or, you know, chicken or beef or tofu or dolphin would probably work too. Throw that in there along with your tomato and onions. Then pour in some cinnamon and cumin. I like to use just enough to make a cloud of cinnamon dust appear in my kitchen. Cook that all together until your protein is edible. Serve over couscous.
Ooooh, mauritian cuisine has something a bit like that. We start by sauteeing some chopped ginger and garlic before adding the onions. And then we ditch the cinnamon and cumin and add a sliced green chilli or two instead. And if we're using fish, we deep-fry it first. Also quickly sautee the prawn before adding to the tomato thingie usually. And then add chopped coriander for garnish.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Eigenbasis » Mon May 02, 2011 10:26 am

Wouldn't the garlic burn if you add it first?
"Have you ever heard the expression, ‘When life gives you lemons, make lemonade, and then throw it in the face of the person who gave you the lemons until they give you the oranges you originally asked for?’"

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by williabr » Mon May 02, 2011 3:39 pm

Only if you keep it on too long by itself. 30 seconds is all the garlic needs, then toss in the onions for a couple minutes. I've never had the garlic burn while doing that.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Ringwraith » Tue May 03, 2011 5:36 am

williabr wrote:Only if you keep it on too long by itself. 30 seconds is all the garlic needs, then toss in the onions for a couple minutes. I've never had the garlic burn while doing that.
QFT! You can always stir it around so it doesn't stick to the pan :)

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Jaelith » Sun May 08, 2011 1:08 am

Simple made-up roasted broccoli and cauliflower soup! Probably last soup of this cold-ass spring, as I'm hoping making soup will jinx summer into appearing. Highly scientific and exacting measurements and method follow.

Preheat oven to 475.

2 big things of broccoli, chopped up (including stems)
1 reasonable size cauliflower, also chopped up
4 smashed up garlic cloves (maybe 5, I wasn't the one smashing so lost track)
1 smallish baking potato, chopped into hunks

Toss around all bits in enough olive oil, salt, and pepper to lightly coat it all. Spread onto foil-lined baking sheet (I ended up needing two) and roast until browny and delicious looking. Took 25 minutes or so, rotating sheet(s) halfway through.

Start some olive oil and a pat of butter heating in dutch oven.

3 big leeks and most of a big onion: slice 'em up, and get them spread into dutch oven with a pinch of salt. Don't mess with them too much, keep the heat low, let them get all golden-caramelized.

Deglaze with some white wine, tip roasted vegetables into pot.

Cover with 4 cups chicken broth, 1 cup vegetable broth, because that's what I had and how much it took. Let cook together a little bit. Get impatient right about when it starts simmering.

Take off heat, blend it all up (I have a stick blender, which is basically my favorite thing ever). It would have been delicious right there, but I poured in some half and half (not a lot) because creamy soups make me happy. Adjust seasonings AFTER dairy addition, not before... although in this case, totally didn't need anything.

Slurp slurp.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by JennyUnderpants » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:40 pm

Because I'm making this right now and it's easy and delicious.

Pan-Roasted Broccoli

2 broccoli crowns, or 1 bunch broccoli, stem trimmed, fibrous outer skin remove, and sliced 1/4 inch on the bias, florets cut into bite-sized tree-like pieces.
1 tbsp canola oil
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp pepper
2-3 tbsp water
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium shallot, minced
1 tbsp butter
juice from 1/2 lemon

1. Add salt, pepper, and water in small bowl. Let salt dissolve. Stir, whatever.
2. Add oil to nonstick pan (one that has a cover) on medium-high until shimmering. Add broccoli stems and cook without stirring so that the stems brown. Add florets and cook until florets start browning too.
3. Add salt/pepper/water mixture to pan and cover until water evaporates, about 2-3 minutes. If there's still water in there when you take the cover off, let all the water cook out.
4. Remove the broccoli (temporarily) and place in a bowl somewhere nearby. Turn heat up to high and add butter. Let butter melt and then brown until butter has a slight nutty aroma. OMG, browned butter <3. Once butter has browned, turn heat off. Add shallots and garlic and toss until fragrant, about 30 seconds.
5. Add broccoli back in, squirt lemon juice in too, and toss everything together to combine flavors.

My broccoli is ready but my pot roast isn't done yet :(
Last edited by JennyUnderpants on Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Eigenbasis » Sun Jun 05, 2011 7:03 pm

If you replace the broccoli with salmon, nix the water, and change up the cooking times, you have a tasty main dish. Salmon with brown butter is great.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by JennyUnderpants » Sun Jun 05, 2011 7:08 pm

I freaking love browned butter. I have a browned butter Pecan Pie recipe, but it's tricky because you can't let the fat solids burn too dark. Too much vigilance for my ADD self, but oh so tasty. I will try your salmon!
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Eigenbasis » Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:22 pm

This is the recipe I've made: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/21/dining/211arex.html

Sauteed Wild Salmon With Brown Butter Cucumbers

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 thick, wild salmon fillets (6 to 8 ounces each)
Kosher salt or freshly ground black pepper
2 Kirby cucumbers, peeled and diced into 1/4-inch cubes (I used English cucumber)
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or cilantro
1 to 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice, more to taste.

1. In a large skillet, melt butter over medium high heat and cook until foam subsides and turns deep gold in color, about 3 minutes.

2. Season salmon with salt and pepper and add to pan, skin side up. Cook without turning for 3 minutes. Add cucumbers and a pinch of salt to pan around salmon and stir to coat with butter. Continue to cook, stirring cucumbers around in pan, until fish turns deep brown, about 3 minutes longer. Flip fish (move cucumbers to the side to assure fish skin makes contact with pan). Add garlic to cucumbers and stir. Cook fish until done to taste, 2 to 4 minutes longer.

3. Transfer salmon to plates. Stir dill and lemon juice into cucumbers in pan and cook for 20 seconds longer. Taste and add more salt, pepper and lemon juice if necessary. Serve cucumbers and butter sauce over fish.

Yield: 2 servings.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by jtay » Mon Jun 06, 2011 12:04 pm

Some recipes that even college students can cook for a fancy dinner :)

My favorite overnight pork tenderloin marinade

1lb Lean pork
1/3 cup soy sauce
2 TBSP sugar
2tsp sesame seeds
1/8 tsp ground ginger
1/8 tsp pepper
1 clove garlic minced
1 green onion chopped

Mix everything in a gallon ziplock bag and leave it overnight in the fridge. Grill it or broil it the next night for something delicious. You can also double the recipe for 2 lbs as well.

I usually cook it with:

Roasted rosemary potatoes

8-10 small red potatoes
6 TBSP olive oil
1 tsp thyme
1 1/2 tsp rosemary
1 tsp salt
3/4 tsp black pepper
3 to 5 cloves of garlic, minced (less if you don't enjoy garlic that much)

Once again, combine everything in a bag really well. Spread everything out on a pan with raised edges and bake in the oven on 400 for about an hour. They should become slightly crispy, although I like to wait until they're somewhat crunchy like a french fry.

And finally for a sauce:

Once the potatoes are done in a small saucepan combine about 2 1/2 TBSP olive oil with about 2 TBSP white vinegar (I don't remember the exact measurements, I just eyeball it) and the crumbs from baking the potatoes. Then heat on low and whisk while slowly combining dijon mustard (about 2-3 TBSP IIRC, once again I usually add the mustard until the olive oil and vinegar sort of totally mix in to one sauce) until everything is mixed together. The goal is to keep whisking so the dijon mustard doesn't curdle. This tastes excellent on the potatoes and can be used as a dipping sauce for the pork as well.

Cheers!
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:58 pm

These tend to be more popular than the regular turkey day dishes in my household!

Turkey Hash Quesadillas

3 medium potatoes, diced 1/4-inch (I use Yukon gold potatoes)
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
2 1/2 tablespoons canola oil
2 cups turkey, cooked & chopped
1 cup swiss cheese, grated
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced
8 flour tortillas

cranberry sauce and sour cream (optional)


Directions:

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Simmer potatoes in a pot of boiling salted water until barely tender (5 minutes). Drain and set aside.

In a heavy skillet (I use cast iron),cook the bacon and onion in 1 tablespoon oil over medium heat, stirring, for 10 minutes. Add the potatoes and cook, stirring, until crisp and golden (should take about 15 minutes- this can vary quite a bit though).

Cool slightly, and stir in turkey, cheese and parsley.

Put 4 tortillas on a baking sheet and brush with some of the remaining olive oil. Turn tortillas over and top each with half the turkey hash, spreading out evenly. Cover with remaining 4 tortillas and brush tops with remaining oil.

Bake in a preheated oven until golden, about 8-10 minutes (I flip them over halfway though).

To serve, cut into wedges and top with cranberry sauce.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Draco Cracona » Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:26 am

Right, thought this would be the best place to ask for recipe ideas; my brother's girlfriend is a Vegetarian, and, well, I'm not too good at veggie dishes. I threw together some stuffed peppers for christmas eve, and did her a roast butternut squash yesterday, and I'm thinking of messing with TEs quesadilla recipe to use the leftover squash today. That still leaves half a raw squash, and I don't have too much of an idea of what the heck to do with it. Anyone have any good suggestions?

I would contribute to the thread, but most of the stuff I cook involves frying with a tomato sauce, quite similar to Thacon's one, and just as precise!

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by JennyUnderpants » Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:33 am

Butternut squash soup! *slobber*
Edit: oh, butternut risotto might be more practical for half a squash.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by top1214 » Mon Dec 26, 2011 2:30 pm

JennyUnderpants wrote: Edit: oh, butternut risotto might be more practical for half a squash.
I've done this before, and it works quite well. I probably used this recipe, bu skipped the chives. I usually just use a regular medium grain rice rather than Arborio. Also, I usually chop my onions more or less the same for everything, which is about a medium dice (cut in half, make your guide cuts, then slice).

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:27 pm

I've used sweet potatoes in that recipe, actually (and whole wheat tortillas) so I imagine squash would work fine, too. The sweet potato version was actually quite tasty.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by jtay » Sun Jan 08, 2012 10:04 pm

transplanted_entwife wrote:I'll start with a chili recipe (which I'm eating at the moment, actually):

TE's Chili

1 lb ground beef
1 chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
splash of red wine (duh)
3 15oz cans chili Beans in sauce (do not drain)
3 15oz cans petite diced tomatoes (do not drain)
1 15oz can dark red kidney beans (drain and rinse)
1 pkg chili seasoning (I use McCormicks)

Brown the ground beef with the onion and garlic; drain if needed
Throw everything else in
Simmer for an hour (can do this for longer- just add a bit of water if needed)
I made this last night and it was excellent. I also put an extra tsp of cayenne and 2 tsp of cumin because I like to kick it up another notch. You can definitely use this as a base chili recipe and add other things to it, I was thinking of putting celery in as well but didn't have any.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Eigenbasis » Tue Mar 06, 2012 7:38 pm

The secret ingredient in my chili is a bottle of Great Lakes Eliot Ness. And a habanero. And drain/wash the beans because that gets rid of the fart-producing compounds.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Eigenbasis » Tue Mar 06, 2012 11:17 pm

Also, I've been on a bit of a grits kick lately. Love 'em with just a dash of salt, butter, black pepper, and cheddar cheese. Probably this weekend I'll be making this Creole Chicken and Grits recipe, although I will sub chicken thighs for the breasts because they're more flavorful (and cut the oil to compensate).
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:08 pm

Coooookies...

Birdseed Cookies
1 stick margarine
2 C. sugar
1/2C. milk

Boil for 3 min, then add
4 TBSP. cocoa

Remove from heat and quickly add:

2 tsp vanilla
1/2 C. peanut butter
3 C. quick oats

Beat thoroughly and drop on waxed paper.

Have to use margarine, disturbing as it is for me to say that.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by lotsofphil » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:04 pm

Why are they called Birdseed?

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:25 pm

Because they're lumpy and my grandmother said so?

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by top1214 » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:03 pm

Butter really doesn't work? :(

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:12 pm

It really doesn't, I've tried with butter multiple times because margarine is not something I keep normally, and they don't come out right at all. I don't understand why, I mean, I make candy with butter.

I still have 2 sticks of margarine left. Might freeze them until Christmas, and make these again then.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Draco Cracona » Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:40 am

littlelolligagged wrote: 1 stick margarine
This may sound strange, but that unit's stumped me a bit- I can get by with your crazy american cups and stuff, but sticks? What's a one of 'em in regular units?

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by lotsofphil » Tue Nov 27, 2012 6:39 am

1 stick = 8 tbsp

edit: how is butter sold, draco? By weight or volume?

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:12 am

This is now stuck in my head!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Im4GwUD1UY8
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Draco Cracona » Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:42 am

lotsofphil wrote:1 stick = 8 tbsp

edit: how is butter sold, draco? By weight or volume?
Thanks, Phil. So that's... half a cup?

Over here, butter's sold by weight, usually in 250g or 500g blocks/tubs.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by slaphappy snark » Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:03 am

Draco Cracona wrote:
lotsofphil wrote:1 stick = 8 tbsp

edit: how is butter sold, draco? By weight or volume?
Thanks, Phil. So that's... half a cup?

Over here, butter's sold by weight, usually in 250g or 500g blocks/tubs.
Yeah, it's half a cup. (Or 4 ounces, but that doesn't really help...)

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by top1214 » Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:10 pm

slaphappy snark wrote:
Draco Cracona wrote:
lotsofphil wrote:1 stick = 8 tbsp

edit: how is butter sold, draco? By weight or volume?
Thanks, Phil. So that's... half a cup?

Over here, butter's sold by weight, usually in 250g or 500g blocks/tubs.
Yeah, it's half a cup. (Or 4 ounces, but that doesn't really help...)
It helps if you know dimensional analysis!

4ounces * 1lb/16 ounces * 1kg/2.2 lbs * 1000g/kg = ~115g

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by lostcalpolydude » Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:34 pm

top1214 wrote:
slaphappy snark wrote:
Draco Cracona wrote:
Thanks, Phil. So that's... half a cup?

Over here, butter's sold by weight, usually in 250g or 500g blocks/tubs.
Yeah, it's half a cup. (Or 4 ounces, but that doesn't really help...)
It helps if you know dimensional analysis!

4ounces * 1lb/16 ounces * 1kg/2.2 lbs * 1000g/kg = ~115g
4 oz (volume) is equal to 4 oz (weight) for water, but in general you need another conversion for that step.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by slaphappy snark » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:03 pm

lostcalpolydude wrote:4 oz (volume) is equal to 4 oz (weight) for water, but in general you need another conversion for that step.
I hadn't really thought about this before earlier today, but there are four sticks in a pound of butter, and I don't think that 'fluid pounds' are a thing. Are they? I don't understand because butter is definitely not the same density as water. Does someone else know what the deal is? My brief internet search was not illuminating, but I'm sure there is more info out there.
Also, in verifying this I discovered that UK and US tsp and tbsp are not equivalent, because they are based on the respective fluid ounces. Also cups are different but not in the same way. So be careful with that too, if this is still the case. My brain is melting a little. Like butter.
Handy link for future butter queries: http://www.onlineconversion.com/cooking_butter.htm
Another general link for US vs imperial baking fun: http://butterbaking.wordpress.com/conversions/

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Pantsless » Sat Dec 01, 2012 4:53 am

Yeah, in both the US and the UK butter is sold by weight, not volume.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter#Siz ... _packaging

The tbsp measurement lines are an approximation.

Here in the US we can't even standardize what a stick of butter is! (east vs west of the rockies). This doesn't bode well for our future adoption of the metric system.

And yeah, every once in a while there's a recipe where you need margarine instead of butter. I make the party mix from the recipe on the back of Crispix cereal boxes (with a few minor tweaks) and I wish butter worked in that recipe, but it just doesn't - everything comes out greasy instead of crispy, if you use butter.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by slaphappy snark » Sat Dec 01, 2012 9:41 am

Pantsless wrote:Yeah, in both the US and the UK butter is sold by weight, not volume.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter#Siz ... _packaging

The tbsp measurement lines are an approximation.

Here in the US we can't even standardize what a stick of butter is! (east vs west of the rockies). This doesn't bode well for our future adoption of the metric system.

And yeah, every once in a while there's a recipe where you need margarine instead of butter. I make the party mix from the recipe on the back of Crispix cereal boxes (with a few minor tweaks) and I wish butter worked in that recipe, but it just doesn't - everything comes out greasy instead of crispy, if you use butter.
You are my hero, Pants! I was starting to wonder whether butter is actually the basis for our measurement system.
I'm surprised that I don't remember weird butter shape from college. Silly east people.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Sat Dec 01, 2012 5:08 pm

We had this at a work event on Friday and I loved it. I asked for the recipe and made it today to test it before posting. It's a bit spicy so you might want to tone it down (or stir in a spoonful of sour cream) if that sort of thing bothers you.

Moroccan Tomato Soup

2 T Olive oil
1 Medium onion, minced
3 Cloves of garlic, minced
28 oz Diced tomatoes, undrained
2 c Water
1 c Creamy peanut butter
1/3 c Ketchup (I substituted 1/4 c tomato paste and 2 T vinegar)
1 T Hot sauce
1 T Unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 T Chili powder
1/2 t Ground cloves
Salt & pepper to taste

In a big stock pot- saute onion until translucent
Add garlic- saute a minute or two
Add tomatoes, water, and peanut butter- simmer for 10 minutes
Add rest of the ingredients
Put everything into a blender and blend until smooth (or use stick blender- that works great)
Dust individual servings with a sprinkle of cinnamon if desired

This is really good cold, also.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:26 pm

Sounds fantastic, now I have to go grocery shopping again.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Draco Cracona » Wed Feb 27, 2013 1:11 pm

So, we've been making enchiladas and stuff in the oven, and been wondering if anyone has any good slow cooker recipes for them?

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by lotsofphil » Wed Feb 27, 2013 1:30 pm

Draco Cracona wrote:So, we've been making enchiladas and stuff in the oven, and been wondering if anyone has any good slow cooker recipes for them?
TE and I were talking about this. Would you make them layered (like lasagna)? I think of enchiladas as rolled up, which wouldn't work that well in a slow cooker (or at least would be kind of inefficient with space).

In any case, I tend to think enchiladas are about the ranchero sauce. I played around with making ranchero sauce last year. Will try to recreate and post.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Draco Cracona » Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:53 pm

lotsofphil wrote:
Draco Cracona wrote:So, we've been making enchiladas and stuff in the oven, and been wondering if anyone has any good slow cooker recipes for them?
TE and I were talking about this. Would you make them layered (like lasagna)? I think of enchiladas as rolled up, which wouldn't work that well in a slow cooker (or at least would be kind of inefficient with space).

In any case, I tend to think enchiladas are about the ranchero sauce. I played around with making ranchero sauce last year. Will try to recreate and post.
Probably have them layered in a lasagne-esque way... I agree that it'd probably not work well as the usual rolled-up ones.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Mai » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:45 am

Plum/Apple Torte

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup white sugar
1 cup unbleached white flour, sifted
1 tsp baking powder
pinch of salt
2 eggs
24 halves pitted purple plums or ~2 sliced apples (can peel, I prefer not to)
Sugar and cinnamon (optional) for topping

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
2. Cream sugar and butter in a bowl
3. Add flour, baking powder, salt, and eggs; beat well
4. Spoon batter evenly into a spring form pan, 8-10 inches works. Place fruit pieces skin side up on top of the batter. If you're using apple, push them into the batter a little bit. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar.
5. Bake for ~30-40 minutes*. Test the center and when it's clean, pull it out. Remove and cool. Serve or cover and refrigerate.

*Every oven does this recipe differently. I've had it finish anywhere from 20-40 minutes. My usual go-to is set a timer for 20 minutes, check, then set another depending.

I've used peaches for this but they're watery, so you should probably flour them before baking. Most any fruit can probably do well in this recipe, just keep liquidity in mind.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by DanceCommander6 » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:16 pm

Butter chicken

This curry is incredibly lush and incredibly simple, making for a great dish to serve when you've got somebody over. I've cooked it for my family while visiting home, I've cooked it whenever I've had a friend over that didn't previously get the butter chicken treatment, and it always does the trick.

Ingredients (serves 4):
  • a large (~500g) pot of natural yoghurt
    half a mug of minced almonds
    1.5 tsp chilli powder
    two crushed bay leaves
    0.5 tsp ground cloves (use them whole if you don't have ground cloves)
    0.5 tsp ground cinnamon
    1 tsp garam masala
    1 tsp ground green cardamon (or use four pods if you don't have ground cardamon)
    1 inch piece of ginger, grated (or 1 tsp ginger powder)
    2-3 cloves of garlic, pressed (or 1 tsp garlic powder)
    a ~400g can of chopped tomatoes (or an equivalent amount of passata)
    0.5 tsp salt
    1kg diced chicken breast
    75g butter
    cooking oil
    2 medium onions, roughly chopped
    chopped fresh coriander
    rice and/or naan/parathas, to serve
By "mug" I mean a proper, roughly 300ml mug; tsp is a heaped teaspoon. Be generous with the spices, and adjust the chilli accordingly to your desired spiciness level.

Making the curry:
  • 1. Get out a nice, big bowl. Combine the almonds, cloves, chilli, bay leaf, cinnamon, garam masala, cardamon, garlic and ginger with about 80% of the pot of yoghurt. Put the rest of the yoghurt away, it's going to be useful in a bit.
    2. Toss in the tomatoes, be it in passata or chopped canned form. Add the salt and mix everything well, to obtain as homogenous a mixture as possible.
    3. Add the diced chicken to the bowl. Try to split the chicken up a bit and coat it with the marinate as much as possible. Put it in the fridge for two hours or so.
    4. Get out your wok, or other designated cooking pot. Heat it up, melt the butter, add a small splash of cooking oil, and fry the onions for ~3 minutes.
    5. Add the chicken with the marinate. Cook for ~10 minutes, constantly stirring, until you can tell that the chicken looks ready.
    6. Turn off the hob, stir in the coriander and the remainder of the yoghurt. If the curry somehow manages to go a bit too cold, heat it up for two minutes or so.
My preferred form of serving the dish is with parathas - a product slightly reminiscent of a hybrid between a tortilla and a croissant, they sell them frozen in Indian and Pakistani shops around here. If you can't get a hold of them, or would prefer to go for a slightly less calorie-bomb approach, rice or naans should do just fine. If you went the whole cardamon route, watch out for the pods when eating. Enjoy!

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Jaelith
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Jaelith » Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:37 pm

Oh hey, this thread! In the continuing theme of copy/pasting from emails that I've sent lately...

Lemon arugula cream pasta
- Ingredients -
-- sauce --
1 tbsp olive oil
3 good sized garlic cloves minced
2 cups heavy cream
2 lemons, zested and juiced
Salt / pepper
-- mix-ins --
"Enough" oil / butter
1 bunch broccoli chopped into bite-size bits (broccolette and broccoli rabe also do well, particularly if you're a fan of sour/bitter like me!)
1 onion chopped into bite-size bits
-- pasta --
1 lb fusilli
-- finishing bits --
1 bunch arugula, chopped into bite-size bits, large stems stripped away
~1/2 cup grated hard white cheese (Parmesan, Romano, Asiago, all work well, and we never actually measure the amount we use)

- Directions -
-- sauce --
* Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat
* Add the garlic and stir for about a minute
* Add the cream, lemon zest and juice, 2 tsp salt, and 1 tsp of pepper (sauce may curdle, don't panic)
* Bring to boil, then lower the heat and simmer until it starts to thicken (15-20 min recommended, but less works just fine if you're in a hurry) while you do the rest
* Stir occasionally
-- mix-ins --
* Saute the onion and broccoli in your preferred fat to your preferred level of doneness (I like both to be a bit browned), set aside
-- pasta --
* Bring large pot of salted water to boil
* Add pasta and cook to a few minutes LESS than package directions (pasta should not be crunchy in middle, but should definitely be undercooked). With the type of fusilli I use, I end up cooking it for 7-8 min.
-- bring it together --
* Drain pasta and return to pot
* Add sauce and cook, stirring, over medium-low heat until most of the sauce has been absorbed (about 3 min)
* Add mix-ins, cheese, arugula, and stir until arugula wilts and everything is well incorporated (can add more salt/pepper at this point to taste)

Substitution / process notes:
* Feels a bit complicated the first time you do it, but is actually easy to do in phases. I start sauce and pasta water boiling, then work on mix-ins while sauce simmers and pasta water comes to a boil, and set those aside to throw in at the end, rather than trying to time them to be done at the same time as other things
* Can totally use 2% milk instead of cream and result is really almost indistinguishable. When we do this, I tend to throw about a tbsp of butter in with the sauce. Also, when using milk, the sauce curdles more, but it comes together in the end, don't freak out.
* Can brown some chicken and add it in, and of course, saute anything else you want in with the onions/broccoli as well (mushrooms would be pretty good, for example)
* When using smaller broccoli variants, I saute the broccoli with the onion as below, but it also works well to throw the broccoli in a bowl with some salt/pepper/water, cover, and nuke in the microwave for ~7 min. This method can work better if you're skipping the onion, or the broccoli seems like it'll be too tough to just saute with the onion.
* Makes a lot! Recipe doesn't scale down well, so make it planning to eat it for several days or to share. Reheats both from fridge/frozen really well, but if you're planning on freezing, recommend that you do it meatless as defrosted/reheated chicken doesn't come out well in it
* Is really just as good at room temperature / coldish as hot, meaning it can be done well in advance and treated as a pasta salad style thing for a lunch or whatnot
* My definition of "bite size" is about .5-1 inch pieces



Caldo verde soup
- Ingredients -
1 tbsp olive oil + 1.5 tbsp olive oil
12 oz Portuguese sausage (kielbasa would also work fine in this) in bite size pieces
1 small onion diced
2 garlic cloves minced
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1 tsp salt
1 lb yukon gold potatoes peeled and cut in bite size pieces
3 cups chicken broth
2 cups water
1 bunch collard greens, stems removed and leaves cut in bite size pieces
1 tsp white wine vinegar
Tabasco to taste
Salt and pepper to taste

- Directions -
* Heat 1 tbsp oil in Dutch oven and lightly brown sausage, then remove sausage to bowl and set aside
* Add onion, garlic, red pepper flakes, 1 tsp salt, pepper to taste and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent (~3-5 min)
* Add potatoes, broth, water and bring to boil, then reduce heat and simmer uncovered until potatoes are just tender, about 10 min
* Remove ~1/2 cup solids and ~1/2 cup liquid to blender or food processor
* Add collards to pot and simmer partially covered 10 min
* Add sausage back to pot, stir, and simmer partially covered until greens are tender, about 10 min
* Add remaining 1.5 tbsp oil to separated solids/liquids and process together until very smooth
* Remove pot from heat and add puree and vinegar, stir
* Add Tabasco, salt, pepper to taste

Substitution / process notes:
* Husband points out that this is essentially exactly how I make collard greens normally, just with sausage instead of bacon, with potatoes added, and more oil involved
* Could make it without the red pepper flakes and Tabasco if you don't like spice and hate life
* My definition of "bite size" is about .5-1 inch pieces

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transplanted_entwife
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Mon Dec 09, 2013 2:53 pm

Okay, gourmet this is not... but it's pretty darn good (esp in the dead of winter)

Hobo Stew
(disclaimer- does not contain hobos)

1 large onion, sliced
8 oz sliced mushrooms
olive oil

Place these in a skillet (cast iron works great) and cook 'em until they are carmelized and yummy. The longer the better- I do this the evening before, sometimes for a few hours.

Place the onion/mushroom mixture in a crockpot with:

4 Polska Kielbasa, sliced
12 Italian style Meatballs
2 Cups Sweet corn (I use frozen)
6 Red potatoes, cut into bite sized pieces
1 Cup baby carrots
2 Cups BBQ Sauce (I use Sweet Baby Ray's Original BBQ sauce)

Cover, cook low for 8 hours
The recipe said that it served 6 but it's more like "4 if you serve a salad too"
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lotsofphil
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by lotsofphil » Mon Dec 09, 2013 2:54 pm

No crotches? No guts? No eyes, boots, skins or skulls?!

Back to the test kitchen!

littlelolligagged
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Mon Dec 09, 2013 3:01 pm

Why don't you want the carrots to grow up to be adult carrots who had a happy childhood before nomming them?


I'll try this, soon. Sounds like something my little monsters would enjoy.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:32 pm

Okay... stew number 1 for the week was fantastic

Dijon Chicken Stew with Potatoes and Kale

4 teaspoons olive oil
2 cups sliced sweet onion (called for leek, but the supermarket I went to had no leek none, because they suck)
4 cloves garlic, minced
~1/3 cup flour
1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, made bite-sized
1/2 pound boneless skinless chicken breast, also bite-sized
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth (I actually used my own unsalted stock, and with the half-teaspoon salt the recipe was quite salty enough for me)
1 tablespoon flour
1 1/2 cups water
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 cups peeled and cubed white potato, this is ~1 pound
8 cups loosely packed torn kale (I bought baby kale, was small enough for no tearing at all)
  • 1. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in large pot over medium-high heat. Saute onion for 6 minutes until it is tender and browned. Add garlic, saute another minute, spoon it into a holding bowl.
    2. Dredge chicken bits in flour, then sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper on them. Heat the rest of the oil, then brown half the chicken (about 6 minutes, turn it around to get it brown all over). Add the first half of the chicken to the holding bowl, then do the same with the rest.
    3. Add the wine to the pan, scrape up all the yummy bits from the bottom. Then combine 1 cup of the broth with 1 tablespoon of flour, and whisk out the lumps. Add that, the rest of your broth, the water, and the Dijon mustard to the pan, and bring it to a boil.
    4. Add all of the chicken and onion into your bot of boiling liquid, cover, reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes.
    5. Add the chopped potatoes, recover, and simmer an additional 30 minutes.
    6. Add kale, cover yet again, and simmer 10 minutes more.
I loved it. My daughter thinks I should use spinach next time, my son added a little Parmesan cheese on top of his.

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transplanted_entwife
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by transplanted_entwife » Thu May 08, 2014 7:48 pm

Slow Cooker Chicken Tikka Masala

28 oz canned crushed tomatoes, undrained
1 small uncooked onion(s), minced
1 Tbsp minced garlic
1 Tbsp ginger root, fresh, minced
2 Tbsp garam masala
1 Tbsp dark brown sugar
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp ground coriander
2 pound(s) uncooked boneless skinless chicken thighs
1 Tbsp kosher salt
1/2 cup(s) plain low fat Greek yogurt
1/4 cup(s) cilantro, fresh, chopped (optional)


Combine all ingredients, except yogurt and cilantro, in slow cooker. Cook on high for 3 to 4 hours or low for 6 to 8 hours. Stir in yogurt and cilantro. The chicken might break down, depending on cooking time, but it's still pretty darned nom.

I served this as listed above, though if you want a more spicy dish you can add red pepper flakes at the beginning of the cooking time.


Serve with:

Coconut Cardamom Rice

2 TB Butter
2C Basmati rice
1 can coconut milk
1 tsp Cardamom
1 tsp salt

Melt 2 tbsp butter in a pot.
Saute 2 cups of basmati rice for 2 minutes.
Combine 1 can of coconut milk and water to make 3 1/3 cups and pour over rice.
Add salt and cardamom.
Bring to boil, cover reduce heat, cook for 20 minutes.
Remove from heat and let stand 5 minutes before fluffing and enjoy.
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Mon Nov 24, 2014 12:32 am

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/cr ... nchiladas/

Haven't tried it yet, but it's totally on my list. It'll have to be chicken, though, since we're not having turkey for Thanksgiving.

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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Mai » Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:10 pm

Grandma Ethel's Cranberry Sauce:

Ingredients:

2 bags fresh cranberries
2 oranges
1 grapefruit
1 20 oz can crushed pineapple in its own juice (not in syrup, v. important- Dole is a good brand)
1 cup sugar (plus more to taste)

Rinse cranberries, pick out icky ones, put in a large saucepan
Add pineapple and its juice
Zest 1 orange, add zest to pot
Cut up both oranges and the grapefruit. Remove peel, veins, large stringy bits (anything bitter), and only add the meat (juicy bits).
Add sugar

Cook over medium heat, stirring often. As the cranberries get soft, pop 'em open (smoooosh) but be careful; they get hot as heck and splatter. Cook until it looks like cranberry sauce (mostly smooth, some pieces still, citrus cooked down, etc.). Add more sugar to taste; depends on how bitter the berries were. Eat it with your face.

Final product can look something like http://i.imgur.com/hoa6eqb.jpg
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Manendra
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by Manendra » Fri Jan 23, 2015 8:40 am

This is a recipe that my fiance and I probably make once a week. It's so simple and so delicious!

Pasta a la Arrabiata
(Serves 2)

Pasta of your choice (we like penne or rigatoni)
1 28oz can whole peeled tomatoes
~4 cloves garlic
salt
crushed red pepper
good parmesan cheese, coarsly shredded
fresh basil

Heat a large (preferably high-sided) skillet with a tablespoon or two of olive oil. When it's medium-hot, dump the entire can of tomatoes in. Immediately use a spoon/spatula/whatever to halve the tomatoes, and let them cook on medium. Meanwhile, mince the 4 cloves of garlic and throw them in. Continue cooking the tomatoes and use your utensil of choice to break down the tomatoes as they soften. While you're doing this, you should probably start the pasta. While the sauce is cooking down, shred your parmesan (we like to use legit parmigiano reggiano, but anything that comes as actual cheese and not powder in a green container will work) and grab a handful of fresh basil leaves and coarsely chop them. Once the pasta reaches your desired consistency (we like it a bit thicker than usual sauce, more like a chutney or something), spice with the salt and crushed pepper to taste.

Throw it on your pasta and top with the parmesan and basil.

This is the sort of recipe that after you've made it a couple times you can basically do it in your sleep. It's also super cheap (other than fancy parma if you choose to go that route). And it's super delicious!
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by littlelolligagged » Sun Jan 25, 2015 5:38 pm

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-cuban-b ... soup-98048


This is tonight's dinner, and it is delicious.

I didn't have a ham bone, so I added in about a tablespoon of better than bullion ham base instead (and no other salt). After 6 hours of cooking the beans still weren't really breaking down into the creamy base, so I hit it with my immersion blender instead. I also browned some chicken Polish-type sausage, sliced it into thin rounds, and put it in for the last 5 minutes or so of cooking.

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top1214
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Re: Nom Nom Nom (recipe thread)

Post by top1214 » Sat Feb 14, 2015 8:36 pm

Yeasty donuts

I went with the peskier method. It worked fine. Put the jelly on one half, put the other half on top, pinch together the edges, and brush with the egg wash. I overfloured my work surface, and probably could've mixed the dough more, as it was pretty sticky and not that cohesive when I took it out of the mixer.


Building
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Pre-cooking
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Cooked
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Breakfast
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Response: "Oh, and they're heart-shaped, how cute! Excuse me, I need to get the syrup." Why? "Aren't these French Toast?" ....No, they're donuts.

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